career management, Careers, Elevator Pitch, entrepreneurs, Job Search, Networking, personal brand management, Personal Branding, self employed, small business

Brand Your Personal Brand in the Minds of Others

Mary Rosenbaum | April 30th, 2010

If you were to ask three colleagues, three friends, and three family members to describe your attributes, strengths, and abilities do you know what they would say? Would they all say the same things? There has been much written about personal branding, in fact, I have written and spoken a great deal about it as well. But have you thought about what it actually means?

Personal BRANDING is the process by which you determine how you want to be viewed by others and then go about BRANDING the words you want them to use when describing you. You are in effect BRANDING your “reputation” in the minds of others.

How do you do this?

1. Find out what others think of you? Have a conversation and ask them the questions that would bring out how they would describe you to others. If you want more detailed information, a 360 assessment is a great tool to use because it offers anonymity and that ensures a higher degree of honesty and accuracy.

2. Do a Strengths, Weakness, Attribute, and Talents analysis (SWAT) using information they provide and include your own self analysis. Once you have this information determine which skills, talents, abilities, attributes and strengths are ones that will further your career. Those are the ones you want to highlight. If there are weaknesses that might prevent you from attaining your goals, think of ways you can ameliorate them (take courses, connect with those who can help you overcome them, partner with people who can fill in your gaps). If they are not road blockers, just forget them and move on.

3. Do a comparative analysis of the skills and abilities you bring to your work. Try to determine how you are the same and what makes you different than your competitors. What gets you in the game – education, years of experience, similar skill sets – should be the same. What makes you different is a combination of what others think of you, special talents and skills you bring to your work, and the way in which you provide your service or do your job.

4. Develop an elevator pitch or personal branding statement that provides the listener with information on what you do, why you do it, what your differentiating qualities are, and the value you provide. You don’t have to be looking for a job or pitching a client to develop a strong personal branding statement or pitch. The reason you are doing this is so that you can “brand” this description into the minds of all you meet and already know.

5. Make sure your messaging is clear and consistent. Everyone should understand what you do and the value you provide. And it should be consistent for everyone you meet.

6. Always be on brand. Make sure that the work you do and the way you present yourself, on and off line are always on brand. It takes a great deal of time to build a reputation, to solidify your brand in other peoples’ minds. It takes considerably less time to destroy it.

Are there other ways you have in identifying your unique promise of value, your personal brand? We would love to hear about them.

Utilizing her experience of over 25 years, Mary Rosenbaum helps entrepreneurs and careerists position themselves so they can stand out from the competition. Get her free report Top Strategies for Getting Visible and Getting Ahead.

Follow me on Twitter @careersguru


Personal Branding – Get More Visible at Work

Mary Rosenbaum | April 22nd, 2010

How visible are you? How visible is your personal brand? Having a great personal brand but lacking visibility in your company is much like throwing a great party but failing to send out the invites. How do you get in front of those who need to know about you and your personal brand?

Getting visible sometimes requires you to take a chance and stick your neck out. Remember that keeping your head down and just doing your job is no longer a winning formula for getting visible and getting ahead.

Here are some tips on ways to get greater visibility.


1. Make sure those who have the power know your unique value. Make sure that updates about projects you are proud of working on get sent to those that need to know. It’s hard to cc the big boss on all your emails, but it might be possible for you to volunteer for a project that puts you in closer proximity where she/he can see you in action as well as hear of your successes. Use caution that you don’t overuse the cc and start to look more like spam than like real information.


2. Attend meetings or speaking engagements where the power people congregate and network with them before and after these events. The idea is for them to know your name, what you do, and ultimately what your unique value is to the firm.

3. Start an internal blog with postings that would be of interest to people in your firm, be on brand, and demonstrate your thought leadership. You could discuss articles, white papers, or interesting work that’s being done in your area that would bring to light your knowledge and expertise while gaining much greater visibility.

4. Networking across departments in your company is critical to developing relationships and alliances, gaining a greater understanding of what other areas of your firm are doing, the expertise they have and need, and how your skills and abilities can be utilized and augmented to better manage your career.

5. Don’t wait for new projects to find you. Create new ways for you to contribute to your company’s success/bottom line. By showing your creativity you will be showcasing your unique value, and building your own net worth and social capital (you make your boss look good if you look good).

6. Is there a project you would love to work on in a different department? If it furthers your career goals, is on brand, and would be a great way to highlight your skills and abilities volunteer to get involved. I know that this can sometimes be difficult to accomplish but this is where your exposure to those with influence helps. Try getting permission by focusing your request not only on why you would be a great addition to the project and add value but that the experience and perhaps even the results would benefit your department as well.

Stand out from the crowd by taking a stand.


Are there other ways you know of getting the visibility and recognition? Please share them with us.

Utilizing her experience of over 25 years, Mary Rosenbaum helps entrepreneurs and careerists position themselves so they can stand out from the competition. Get her free report Top Strategies for Getting Visible and Getting Ahead.

Follow me on Twitter @careersguru



Personal Branding – Developing Your Vision Statement

Mary Rosenbaum | April 13th, 2010

I thought this was an interesting read in light of my previous post on the importance of having a vision in developing your brand. Understanding your vision provides you with a direction for your business and your career. This article on how to develop your and your company’s vision statement in 24 words should help in developing your thought process. Let me know what you think.

Utilizing her experience of over 25 years, Mary Rosenbaum helps entrepreneurs and careerists position themselves so they can stand out from the competition. Get her free report Top Strategies for Getting Visible and Getting Ahead.

Follow me on Twitter @careersguru


Personal Branding – The Power of Vision and Purpose

Mary Rosenbaum | April 8th, 2010

The hardest concept for most professionals and entrepreneurs to understand and embrace is how important it is to identify their vision of the world and how their vision defines their purpose. Your vision doesn’t have to be something as lofty as saving the world’s poor from starvation. Yet your vision is an integral part of who you are and what you want to do with your life.

I recently interviewed Andrew Saunders  and thought that part of this interview would be a perfect way to illustrate the power of vision and purpose in personal branding. Understanding your vision and identifying your purpose is integral to creating a brand that is authentic to who you are, enabling you to stand out from the crowd.

Meet Andrew Saunders. Andrew had a vision. After working in real estate development and sales throughout his professional career he wanted to fix what he believed was a serious failing of the large real estate brokerage firms. Rather than be supportive of their brokers, encouraging them and partnering with them in their success these firms were marginalizing their workers by shrinking work spaces, eliminating support and support staff, and reducing commissions. They were undermining the hard work of those who brought in the revenue.

Andrew’s vision was to work in a firm where support and partnership was the order of the day. He believed that a company that supported its employees and provided them with the tools they needed was critical to establishing an environment where partnership and respect would be reciprocated between management and employees. He also believed that a collaborative and supportive environment would reflect positively on the revenues of the brokers and the firm while creating a better experience for clients as well.

In late 2008 Andrew started up operations for his new business Saunders Real Estate, a company whose tag line is “A higher form of realty”.  He created a real estate firm in a crowded market that stood apart from its competitors. His personal brand, being supportive and collaborative, became the firm’s brand and extended across all the activities of his brokers and those with whom they transacted business. His brokers and clients were treated with the dignity and respect as befits a company “that sells high end luxury properties to high end clients.”

Andrew’s brand is strong. His commitment to his vision and his purpose enabled him to develop a personal brand that is authentic to who he is, unique in execution, and consistent in delivery. The cornerstone of a strong brand is respect. The respect he gained for his new brand of realty helped him grow the firm to 50 brokers and attain profitability in under 1 ½ years. And all this was accomplished in a real estate recession.

Have you defined your vision and purpose? Let me know if you have other stories like this to share.

Follow me on twitter @careersguru

Utilizing her experience of over 25 years, Mary Rosenbaum helps entrepreneurs and careerists position themselves so they can stand out from the competition. Get her free report Top Strategies for Getting Visible and Getting Ahead.


Vision, Passion, Purpose

Mary Rosenbaum | April 1st, 2010

Here is a great take on the value of Vision, Passion, and Purpose.  I saw this great video the other day on these three key elements that are integral in helping you define your authentic brand. Let me know if you enjoyed it as much as I did.

Utilizing her experience of over 25 years, Mary Rosenbaum helps entrepreneurs and careerists position themselves so they can stand out from the competition. Get her free report Top Strategies for Getting Visible and Getting Ahead.